Painter in Your Pocket – Online Video Course!

As most of you already know, I left my corporate job almost five years ago (I can’t believe it’s been that long – amazing how quickly time passes when you really enjoy what you’re doing).  My only regret about it is that I didn’t do it sooner.  I have since continued blogging, and started a side business painting kitchen cabinets and refinishing furniture.  I love the transformation process and I receive a lot of painting questions from readers, even requests to travel to their state to paint their cabinets.  So, I’ve decided to step out of my comfort zone a bit and go beyond the painting tutorials and the Painter in Your Pocket series that I have shared here on the blog.  And since I don’t have a mobile workshop, and I can’t come to all of you, I’m going to offer classes online, holding your hand throughout the process – a Painter in Your Pocket – Online Video Course, specializing in painting your kitchen cabinets.

Painter in Your Pocket Video Series

I’m not going to lie.  When I shared this on Instagram and Facebook, and had people signing up, interested in learning more, I felt a little sick to my stomach.  

But I know there is a need, and I’m really hoping to help fill it.  I know many of you are visual learners, and like to see how things are done and ask questions to a real person.  I get it.  Taking on a project like painting your kitchen cabinets is a daunting one, and you don’t want to screw it up.  When I did my kitchen (the first time I’ve ever painted cabinets), I felt a bit sick as I pulled the trigger on that spray gun, so I know it feels.  Talk about feeling sick to your stomach.

Painter in Your Pocket Video Series

Here’s how it will work:

  • I will walk you through the process of painting your cabinets, step-by-step, online.  If you can’t be there to watch the videos live, or need to watch them over again, you will have access to the recordings, on demand.
  • The class will be 4-5 weeks in duration, with a different topic covered each week.
  • You will be provided with a full supply list of products and tools that I trust and use regularly.
  • You will get online discounts for new cabinet hardware and pulls.
  • We will cover everything from choosing paint colors to troubleshooting paint sprayers.
  • You will be part of a private Facebook membership group, with a community of DIYers working along with you.
  • As part of the Facebook group, you will also have direct access to me – ask me questions, pick my brain, you name it.  I’ll be there to help.

Interested?  Click here to get on the list and learn about the dates and details as they become available.  

Painter in Your Pocket - Sign Me Up!

I’m nervous and excited about this new online video series, and my hope is that I have a bunch of awesome before and afters that result from this process.  No matter the size or age of your kitchen, I know we can give it a refresh.  Is there anything else you would like to see as part of this class?  I’m all ears, as I’m here to help YOU!

Painted Oak Kitchen Before and After

Before-After Oak Kitchen

How to Paint Kitchen Cabinets Video Series Before-After

Jenny

42 Comments

  • Reply
    Jess
    January 8, 2018 at 10:31 am

    Congrats! This sounds awesome! Way to chase your goasl!

    • Reply
      Jenny
      January 8, 2018 at 1:51 pm

      Thanks Jess! I’m really excited about the whole thing as I’ve been wanting to do it for awhile now!

  • Reply
    Joan Burgert
    January 8, 2018 at 1:48 pm

    I live in Columbus, Ohio. I moved into my house in October 2014. We had a professional painter paint our cherry cabinets white, but we discovered later that he did not prep them well and they chipped horribly. Last year,2016, we had them painted again and the painter took the doors and stripped them and spray painted them. Some are still chipping and it is driving me crazy. I’m thinking of sanding and painting again this summer. Any suggestions, is it hopeless?

    • Reply
      Jenny
      January 8, 2018 at 1:50 pm

      Do you know what kind of prep/paint the last painter used?

    • Reply
      Joan Burgert
      January 27, 2018 at 11:09 am

      I didn’t realize my entire name would be posted. Can you delete my last name.

  • Reply
    Debbie
    January 8, 2018 at 2:05 pm

    What if we’re not on Facebook???

    • Reply
      Jenny
      January 8, 2018 at 2:42 pm

      I’m looking into another option of having videos available for purchase separately as well so that if you don’t want to be part of the Facebook group, that’s an option as well.

  • Reply
    Diane Richards
    January 8, 2018 at 2:18 pm

    I would love to paint my kitchen cabinets and yes, I am terrified. I am very interested and depending on the cost, I would love to follow along visually and be able to ask questions. I really commend you for taking this on!

    • Reply
      Jenny
      January 8, 2018 at 2:43 pm

      Thanks Diane! It’s been in my head for awhile now, and I’ve decided this is the year that I need to take that leap!

  • Reply
    Beth
    January 8, 2018 at 3:30 pm

    Jenny-what a terrific idea. You were my go to source online when I was researching how to paint my kitchen cabinets in 2013. Prepping and painting was done over the course of several months as my kitchen was being updated in other ways. I went the extra step of filling in the oak grain which was very time consuming. Using the BM Advance paint and a sprayer for the first time had a learning curve but I am very proud of the 42 cabinet doors and drawer fronts that transformed my kitchen and laundry room. Thank you for sharing your expertise then and for making it possible now to teach others what you have learned through all the kitchens you have worked on since.
    P.S. I am also a huge fan of audiobooks!

    • Reply
      Jenny
      January 8, 2018 at 4:18 pm

      I love hearing that my tutorials were helpful Beth! I know what a scary and intimidating project it is, so I figured this would be a good way to help people get over the hump. 🙂

  • Reply
    Kathy
    January 8, 2018 at 5:58 pm

    I have glossy maple veneer cabinets that look orange. I have heard it is much more difficult to get a professional looking finished product with this cabinet type. Looking forward to your expert advice!

  • Reply
    Kathy
    January 9, 2018 at 6:04 am

    Beautifully redone cabinetry via paint! Question: In the second set of pictures, it appears as if the beams or the cabinets have moved. The beam was over the seam where two different cabinets meet, and in the second picture, the beam has moved over to the right. Also how is there room for crown molding in the second pic if there wasn’t room in the first? Are these different doors entirely?

    • Reply
      Jenny
      January 9, 2018 at 7:31 am

      These are the same doors – the homeowner had a carpenter come in and install molding on the island and crown molding along the top of the upper cabinets. Nothing moved, just the camera angle there. 🙂

  • Reply
    Karin
    January 9, 2018 at 6:27 am

    Great idea! I have been dreaming of painting my own cabinets for a while. It is an intimidating task, for sure and I truly admire that you keep taking it on over and over! One question for you. What normally comes first new countertops or painting the cabinets?

    • Reply
      Jenny
      January 9, 2018 at 10:48 am

      Thanks Karin! If you’re planning on replacing your countertops, I would do those first. It’s always easier to choose a paint based on colors in a countertop than working in reverse. 🙂

  • Reply
    Lisa
    January 9, 2018 at 9:58 am

    Exciting stuff Jenny!! You’ll be great at this – especially since you’ll be talking about something you know so well and love doing!!

  • Reply
    Cyndy
    January 9, 2018 at 1:25 pm

    Yay!! So so excited that you’re going to do this! Yes there is a need and yes, you’re the perfect person to teach us! Can’t wait!

    • Reply
      Jenny
      January 9, 2018 at 5:35 pm

      Thanks so much Cyndy! I’m really excited about it!

  • Reply
    Lori
    January 9, 2018 at 4:34 pm

    Will the course help those cursed with the dreaded laminate cabinets?

  • Reply
    Margot Broglin
    January 11, 2018 at 2:04 pm

    I have a situation that I have not seen addressed in any blog to date. We purchased our home 10 years ago and our kitchen cabinets are builder grade oak which the prior owners painted white with latex paint. Many of the high use areas have dings and chips because the paint is not hard. Over the years we have touched up many, many times, but they still look bad. We had a carpenter come out because we were interested in having them sanded and repainted, along with having an island built. He repainted our friend’s cabinets and built them a new bar area and it looks amazing. Anyway, he came out and looked at our cabinets and said that because of the gummy latex paint, it would be more cost-effective to have him build new door and drawer fronts. He said that it would be very labor-intensive to sand the latex paint off of the cabinets. We were not expecting to hear that and we have now reconsidered the whole project. The cabinets are not great, but they are not terrible either. We are now wondering if we would be better off to just rip them out and install new cabinets for the cost. What is your take on this? We really just don’t know what to do at this point.

    • Reply
      Jenny
      January 11, 2018 at 9:48 pm

      I’m not sure of the cost involved to do this, but I’m offering it as a suggestion as an alternative to all new doors (which also isn’t cheap). Look around your local area to see if you can find a company that does sand blasting. I’ve seen it done (on video) and it’s amazing. Removes old finishes and gives you a blank slate to start fresh again. I wish I could do it myself! 🙂 If that’s not an option, I would probably replace the cabinets altogether vs. refacing them. Another source might be to contact a cabinet company and see if they can “dip” them to remove the old finish. Just some ideas – hope this helps!

      • Reply
        Margot Broglin
        January 17, 2018 at 11:43 am

        I will look into the sandblasting, but I don’t know that I want to put that much time and money into these old cabinets. They are from the early 90’s and are not all solid wood. The doors and frames are wood, but the interior shelves and bases are pressboard and in some of the cabinets where we have heavier items, they are starting to warp. I was hoping for some sort of miracle product that would strip the paint off so we could just repaint them and not have to put a ton of time and money into them. Thank you so much for your advice and ideas!

  • Reply
    Win Wuttke
    January 11, 2018 at 4:04 pm

    Hi Jess, your website/blog is amazing, so much good information.

    I’m in the process of starting to paint our beautiful existing polyurethane finished oak kitchen cabinets.
    1. Start with cleaning cabinets, use Simple Green, all purpose cleaner
    2. Use Krud Kutter Gloss-Off for deglosser.
    3. Next, Zinsser High Hide Cover-Stain – Spray with HVLP Fuji Mini-Mite 4 Platinum paint sprayer, 2 coats
    4. Next, either Benjamin Moore, Insl-X Cabinet Coat – Spray with same paint sprayer, Acrylic Enamel, 2 Coats
    4. or Rust-Oleum Professional High Performance Protective enamel – Oil Based, 2 coats

    The dilemma I have is with the final coat, BM – Cabinet Coat or Rust-Oleum High Performance Enamel.
    Do you have any recommendation for the final top coat?

    Thank you
    WW

    • Reply
      Jenny
      January 11, 2018 at 9:35 pm

      I don’t have any experience with either of those products, but I can tell you that with the Benjamin Moore Advance and the PPG Breakthrough, you don’t have to topcoat either one of them. Do either of those products indicate that you need to top coat them?

      • Reply
        Win Wuttke
        January 12, 2018 at 12:45 am

        Thank you, my understanding both products don’t require a top.

        INSL-X CABINET COAT Acrylic Enamel
        http://www.insl-x.com/product-detail/inslx-products/cabinet-coat-enamel

        Professional High Performance Protective Enamel – Oil Based
        https://www.rustoleum.com/product-catalog/consumer-brands/professional/high-performance-protective-enamel

        • Reply
          Jenny
          January 12, 2018 at 9:15 am

          If they don’t require a top coat, I’d say leave it alone. 🙂 The topcoat has a tendency to yellow the paint.

      • Reply
        Win Wuttke
        January 12, 2018 at 8:22 am

        Hi Jenny, you mentioned Benjamin Moore Advance and the PPG Breakthrough, which ones have you used and had good success? We are looking at the color white or off-white.

        PPG, BREAK-THROUGH!® 50 Interior/Exterior Water-Borne Acrylic
        PPG, BREAK-THROUGH!® 250 Interior/Exterior Water-Borne Acrylic
        BM, ADVANCE Interior Paint- Primer (790)
        BM, ADVANCE Interior Paint- Satin (792)
        BM, ADVANCE Interior Paint- Semi-Gloss (793)
        BM, ADVANCE Interior Paint- High-Gloss (794)

        • Reply
          Jenny
          January 12, 2018 at 9:14 am

          I have used the BM Advance in a satin finish and the PPG Breakthrough 50 in a Satin finish. Both are great products!

          • Win Wuttke
            January 12, 2018 at 12:01 pm

            Thanks for the Satin finish recommendation,.this will be more forgiving than the Semi-Gloss.
            This morning I spoke with a Benjamin Moore factory rep and he recommended the BM INSL-X CABINET COAT Acrylic Enamel with the BM Fresh Start High-Hiding All Purpose Primer Primer (046) (Acrylic) The reason noted, the Advance tends to yellow after time. The acrylic primer will bond to the polyurethane better than the oil based primer.
            Jenny, there are so many product choices it’s hard to choose which on is best, I know I want the best professional result and willing to go whatever it takes.
            WW

  • Reply
    Win Wuttke
    January 11, 2018 at 4:17 pm

    Hi Jenny, sorry I addressed you as Jess, can you change my last comment to you as Hi Jenny.
    Thank you
    WW

  • Reply
    Natalie fleischer
    January 14, 2018 at 10:07 am

    I am really looking forward to your on-line tutorial! Just registered for more info. I love painting and was just talking to my sister yesterday about coming up with a one year transition plan to quit my stressful corporate job to paint interiors full time. My cabinets need to be painted and I am planning on working on the job this Spring and depending on how it goes and how much I enjoy the transformation, I want to consider that service as part of my business here in south jersey. I would love to connect on the business start up journey you went through. I’m not a blogger but am hoping that there’s still a way to get out there and pursue something that I am passionate about.

    • Reply
      Jenny
      January 14, 2018 at 3:48 pm

      It sounds like we have a similar background Natalie! Although I didn’t anticipate doing kitchens as a business when I started – it kind of grew after doing my own kitchen, and then painting kitchens for friends. Who would have guessed? It’s definitely a good niche to be in though because a lot of painters don’t want to touch kitchen cabinets! I really love it though!

  • Reply
    Carolyn
    February 3, 2018 at 6:09 am

    I have oak cabinets that I’m ready to paint white. I’m such a perfectionist and wanting the end result to look professional. I’ve viewed many videos and read countless tutorials. I’m so excited I found your site and so ready to start this project. Let the fun begin.

  • Reply
    Dalanna
    February 8, 2018 at 5:32 pm

    Have you ever used paint brushes rather than spraying cabinets? And what are your pros vs cons using a sprayer? I want to take your class as we are going to redo our cabinets this spring and want to have everything ready to go!! Thanks for your info!

    • Reply
      Jenny
      February 8, 2018 at 10:19 pm

      GREAT question!! And 90% of the time (or more), I hand paint the frames in the kitchens that I paint. I will spray the kitchen if it’s really large, or really detailed, but most of the time I will hand paint. The pros of spraying is that you get a sprayed look on the frames and the doors (I ALWAYS spray the doors though), but again, unless you have a lot of detail, it’s A LOT of extra work in terms of prep. And really, at the end of the day, the doors and drawers are pretty much the stars of the show. Not to say that frames aren’t important, but they kind of fade to the background once the doors are installed.

  • Reply
    Kate
    March 11, 2018 at 7:59 pm

    I’m getting ready to paint my maple cabinets and I’m super nervous about how the outcome will be. I’m debating on spraying the boxes, but i know it’s a lot more work than rolling. I already have the sprayer and my kitchen is about your size.. which would you recommend I do? There is also not too many details at all in my cabinetry. Another question.. HOW have yours held up??
    Thanks Jenny!

    • Reply
      Jenny
      March 13, 2018 at 10:07 pm

      If you have a large kitchen, I would consider spraying the whole thing. While the prep is a lot of work – once you start spraying, it’s quick and you have a great finished product. Mine held up great – I just got a bit bored with the color and sprayed them again! :-0 Not my brightest moment.

  • Reply
    Michelle
    April 14, 2018 at 3:29 pm

    Nice work! Just wondering though, in the second set of pics, one one with the bananas in the basket, how it it that there is crown mouldings at the top of the cabinets but does not appear to be any in the “before” pic. Nor does there seem to be any room to have placed them after. Photoshop?

    • Reply
      Michelle
      April 14, 2018 at 3:36 pm

      Even the center beam isn’t in the same place??

      • Reply
        Jenny
        April 14, 2018 at 3:57 pm

        No beams were moved in that makeover, I can promise you that. 🙂

    • Reply
      Jenny
      April 14, 2018 at 3:56 pm

      Not Photoshopped – they added crown molding to the top of the cabinets, and the angle of the camera makes it look a little bit different.

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